Ashwagandha; withania somnifera

Ashwagandha is a woody shrub that grows up to 2’-4’ in height, but varies in location and climate. The leaves are a dull green hue, and are considered ovate and alternate. You can replant Ashwagandha by harvesting its bright yellow seeds in the Spring, but they must be dried out. The root systems of Ashwagandha is where the medicinal value is majorly harvested and used.

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Borage; borago officinalis

Borage is a bristly plant and should be handled carefully. It has hair covering the stem and leaves. You will also be able to distinguish this plant from others by its fresh scent of cucumber or watermelon. Borage is considered an annual plant, however, it does well self-seeding on its own. Some say this plant can be a nuisance and can take over lawns. Additionally, Borage produces droopy blue to pink flowers in the shape of a star. It’s loved by the bees and does well in poor soil conditions.

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Goldenrod; solidago spp

There are over 100 species of Solidago found throughout the world, though majority call home in North America and is part of the Asteraceae family. Goldenrod is a tall plant, but it’s commonly mistaken for ragweed. To make the difference clear, Goldenrod can grow up to 7’ tall and with each stem they produce, you will find a well lined-up assortment of yellow flowers that are densely companact to one another. Their stems are hairy, and their leaves are alternate and simple. You will also notice that its leaves also have hair, and a main distincting factor when ID’ing Goldenrod is noticing 3 large veins within its leaves.

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Holy Basil; ocimum sanctum

Holy Basil has leaves growing themselves in opposites, in true mint fashion, and the stems will be square with a slightly hairy aesthetic. Holy Basil produces a long stalk shooting straight up from the middle of its base, producing a tower of awestrucking flowers, of which are irregular. Typically this plant gets up to 3’-4’ tall.

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